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North Dakota

North Dakota is one of the fifty states of the U.S. It has an overall rectangular shape and is bordered by South Dakota, Montana, and Minnesota. It is the 19th largest state and is also the third least populous state out of the fifty states.[1] Average yearly temperatures in North Dakota range from 37 degrees Fahrenheit in the northern areas of the state to 43 degrees Fahrenheit in the south. January is the coldest month of the year and typically receives low temperatures, while July is the warmest month of the year and receives higher temperatures. it is common for temperatures to reach extremes, both hot and cold.[7] Attractions within North Dakota are the North Dakota Heritage Center, Fort Abraham Lincoln State Park, the National Buffalo Museum, the Plains Art Museum, the Scandinavian Heritage Park, Lake Sakakawea, and the Theodore Roosevelt National Park.[4] The Theodore Roosevelt National Park consists of more than 70,000 acres where visitors can do a variety of activities, including a number of outdoor recreational activities.[5] 

What North Dakota is known for

North Dakota is the 19th largest state out of the fifty states of the United States of America. However, it is also the third least populous state. North Dakota became a state in 1889 on the same day that South Dakota was admitted. Because both conditions wanted to be the first to become a state, the president at the time, President Benjamin Harrison, signed the statehood papers without knowing which one was first. However, because North Dakota comes before South Dakota alphabetically, it was the first of the two for the statehood to be published. President Theodore Roosevelt spent a significant amount of time within North Dakota, which became home to the Theodore Roosevelt National Park.[1] North Dakota is also home to other attractions such as the National Buffalo Museum, the North Dakota Heritage Center, the Plains Art Museum, the Scandinavian Heritage Park, Fort Abraham Lincoln State Park, and Lake Sakakawea.[4]

The Theodore Roosevelt National Park was established on November 10, 1978. Talk of creating a national park that would be named after President Theodore Roosevelt started shortly after his death in 1919. The point of the park was to establish a memorial in his honor. People looked all over the country for a place where the national park could be established. During this time, the North Dakota legislature had their representatives in Congress set aside land for the national park. Eventually, land located in North Dakota was chosen to become the Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Originally, 29,920 acres of land were set aside for the park. Now, the Theodore Roosevelt National Park consists of 70,448 acres of land.[6]

Within the Theodore Roosevelt National Park, there are multiple trails, roads, forests, lakes, and visitor centers. Specific things visitors can do when visiting the park include the Painted Canyon Visitor Center, Prairie Dog Town, the Maltese Cross Ranch Cabin, the Scenic Loop Drive, the Oxbow Overlook, Medora, and the Elkhorn Ranch Site.[5]

North Dakota currently has a population of 762,062 people. Most of North Dakota is devoted to farming and agriculture. North Dakota is the number one producer of dry navy and pinto beans. The state also provides more than 90% of the nation's flaxseed and canola. The state is ranked eighth in its natural environment.[9]

Geography

North Dakota is located within the northern part of the United States of America. The state has a rectangular shape and is bordered by Montana, South Dakota, and Minnesota. North Dakota is also right up against Canada, specifically Manitoba and Saskatchewan. North Dakota has no major cities and no large mountains. Instead, there are towns, lakes, rivers, and forests. Small cities within North Dakota include Williston, Dickinson, Bismarck, and Minot. A part of both Grand Forks and Fargo is also located within the state.[10]

Mammals that live in North Dakota include American bison, white-tailed deer, black-tailed prairie dogs, domestic horses, pronghorn, coyotes, moose, muskrats, American beavers, North American porcupines, raccoons, striped skunks, wapiti, American badgers, long-tailed weasels, North American river otters, donkeys, and American black bears. Plants that grow well in North Dakota are field bindweeds, prairies roses, common yarrow, alfalfa, box elders, wood lilies, lead plants, green ash, yellow salsify, and leafy spurge.[8]

North Dakota has temperatures that fluctuate both throughout the year and throughout each day. The state receives both cold and dry weather, along with warm and wet weather. Average temperatures range from 37 degrees Fahrenheit in the north to 43 degrees Fahrenheit in the southern part of the state. January is typically the coldest month of the year. In the north, the average temperature during January is 2 degrees Fahrenheit while it is 17 degrees Fahrenheit in the southwest. There is an average of fifty days that receive temperatures that fall below zero degrees. July is the warmest month of the year with temperatures from 73 degrees Fahrenheit in the south and 67 degrees Fahrenheit in the north. It is common for temperatures to reach over 90 degrees Fahrenheit. The highest temperature recorded in North Dakota is 121 degrees Fahrenheit, while the coldest is recorded as -60 degrees Fahrenheit. Both the warmest and coldest temperatures happened in the year 1936.[7]

North Dakota receives an average of 13 to 20 inches of precipitation a year. The southeastern part of the state receives the most precipitation throughout the year. January is the most common month for winter precipitation. June is, most commonly, the wettest month of the year receiving 3 to 4 inches of rain. Certain areas receive more or less rain depending on the surrounding landscape.[7]

History

The first people who inhabited the North Dakota area were big-game hunters who targeted giant bison and wooly mammoths. They came to the area because of the retreat of the glaciers, which took place around 10,000 B.C. In later civilizations, there were two main methods of survival, which were nomadic groups and agricultural societies.[2] 

From 1905 to 1920, North Dakota's population increased to 646,872 from previously being around 190,983. The two largest groups of people consisted of the Scandinavians and the Germans who came from Russia. People with Celtic and English backgrounds also made up a portion of the population.[2] 

Many Germans immigrated to North Dakota from Russia during the 1880s and settled in south-central areas of the state. They left Russia for political and social reasons and chose to settle in America. Around half of the German population came from Russia, while the other half came from Germany. Approximately 43% of North Dakota's population comprises people descended from German immigrants.[2]

People also came to North Dakota from Sweden, Finland, Denmark, and Norway. Most of them settled in the east and north-central parts of North Dakota. In current times, 193,000 people of Norwegian heritage live in North Dakota. Around 39% of the state's population is comprised of Scandinavian descendants. Around 33% is Norwegian.[2]

The first interactions between American Indians and Europeans in North Dakota dealt with fur trading. The most popular furs to trade with were beaver pelts and buffalo hides. Pierre de La Verendrye was the first white man in North Dakota. He visited the Mandan tribe on behalf of a trading company that wanted to start doing work with them. The first trading post in the state was established in 1801 at Pembina, which is located by Alexander Henry. Trading posts were found at Fort Union and Fort Clark, which are located near the present-day Williston and Washburn. The posts were established to enhance trade with the Native Americans and Metis trappers and hunters.[2] 

North Dakota first became a state when congress passed an omnibus bill that granted statehood to Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Washington. The bill was called the Enabling Act of 1889. North Dakota and South Dakota both wanted to become the first of the two to be a state, and it caused rivalries. In an effort to keep things equal the president at the time instructed the Secretary of State to shuffle the papers before giving them to the president to sign. It is unknown which of the documents the president signed first. However, because North Dakota comes before South Dakota alphabetically, its proclamation was published first.[3]

Top Bed and Breakfasts in North Dakota, United States

Explore a property in North Dakota

#1

Volden Farm Bed and Breakfast

Luverne, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#2

Prairie Winds Bed and Breakfast

Milnor, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#3

Spirit Water Inn

Minnewaukan, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#4

Sage Hill Bed and Breakfast

Anamoose, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#5

Deepwater Bay Bed and Breakfast

Parshall, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#6

Old School Center

Fortuna, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#7

The Dakotah Rose Bed and Breakfast

0 (0 Reviews)

#8

Whiskey Butte Lodge

Flasher, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#9

The Ponderosa Inn

Hettinger, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#10

Blacktail Lodge

Belfield, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#11

221 Melsted Place

Mountain, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#12

Happy Host Inn

Grand Forks, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#13

Missouri River Breaks Lodge

0 (0 Reviews)

#14

Totten Trails Historic Inn

Fort Totten, North Dakota
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#15

The Broken Bell Inn

Napoleon, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#16

Crocus Inn

Regent, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#17

Midstate Bed and Breakfast

McClusky, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#18

Bunkhouse Bed and Breakfast

Grassy Butte, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#19

Rock Roof Inn-Bed and Breakfast

Glen Ullin, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#20

Lady On The Lake Bed and Breakfast LLC

Hankinson, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#21

Prairie Vista

Regent, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#22

Dakota Place Lodge

Medora, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#23

Black Gold Suites

0 (0 Reviews)

#24

Little Missouri Inn & Suites Watford City

Watford City, North Dakota
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#25

Tower City Inn

Tower City, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#26

El Vu Motel

Bowman, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

Top 10 Bed and Breakfasts in North Dakota, United States
#1

Volden Farm Bed and Breakfast

Luverne, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#2

Prairie Winds Bed and Breakfast

Milnor, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#3

Spirit Water Inn

Minnewaukan, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#4

Sage Hill Bed and Breakfast

Anamoose, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#5

Deepwater Bay Bed and Breakfast

Parshall, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#6

Old School Center

Fortuna, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#7

The Dakotah Rose Bed and Breakfast

0 (0 Reviews)

#8

Whiskey Butte Lodge

Flasher, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#9

The Ponderosa Inn

Hettinger, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)

#10

Blacktail Lodge

Belfield, North Dakota
0 (0 Reviews)